About

My first career was in biochemistry. In 1999 I worked in a cancer lab at Sloan Kettering in NYC slicing frozen melanonas with a tool akin to a deli slicer. For my Senior Thesis at Williams College in 2001-2, I implanted rats with blood-pressure measuring telemeters in an attempt to study the relationship between caloric intake and blood pressure. Finding that it was I, not the sprague-dawleys in the experiments, who had become a lab rat, I decided I should find an intellectual job where I could work outside. I thought the Middle East was likely to be a growth field. In retrospect, I might have picked China. Either way, I didn’t realize I was substituting the lab for the library.

Since that fateful  life decision in 2002, I’ve lived and worked in Egypt, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Lebanon, Oman, and Syria (where I was a Fulbright Fellow). As I’ve grown fond of saying: I’ve been at three stonings, two car bombings, and have been kidnapped once.  That plus the fact that I have probably spent over a year of my life chatting with taxi drivers in Arabic has hopefully given me a different perspective from most academics from which to analyze the region.   In 2010, I had my first 9-6 office job as Program Manager at a DC-based trade association seeking to promote US-Libya commercial and diplomatic ties.

Now, I have a Master’s degree in Middle Eastern History from Oxford (my thesis was on Libya during the British Military Administration period in the 1940s) and am currently enrolled in a PhD program at Cambridge.  In addition, to my phd research and my editorial journalism, I advocate for certain policies towards Libya while trying to bring a balanced analyses onto the desks of policy makers and CEOs.

3 responses to “About

  1. Thank you for this very useful information.

  2. Hi Jason,
    Frank Wag told me you contacted him and then he sent me your website. Very interesting and exciting in terms of the academic and the historical. You certainly have written a plethora of articles.

    Ms. Kuenzel

  3. I’ve been at three stonings, two car bombings, and have been kidnapped once. That plus the fact that I have probably chatted with over 1000 Arab taxi drivers has given me a reasonable basis with which to analyze the region.

    None of the above remotely form a reasonable basis with which to analyse the region.

    Pipelines, whether transporting petroleum or water are not an anathema to Federalism.

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